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Allergies Home Page arrow About Allergies arrow Children and Allergies arrow When to Suspect an Allergy
When to Suspect an Allergy PDF Print E-mail
Some allergies are easy to identify by the pattern of symptoms that invariably follows exposure to a particular substance. But others are more subtle, and may masquerade as other conditions.

Here are some common clues that could lead you to suspect your child may have an allergy.

  • Recurrent red, itchy, dry, sometime scaly rashes in the creases of the skin, wrists, and ankles.

  • Repeated or chronic coldlike symptoms - that last more than a week or two, or develop at about the same time every year. These could include a runny nose, nasal stuffiness, sneezing and throat clearing.

  • Nose rubbing, sniffling, snorting, sneezing and itchy, runny eyes.

  • Itching or tingling sensations in the mouth and throat. Itchiness is not usually a complaint with a cold, but it is the hallmark of an allergy problem.

  • Coughing, wheezing, difficulty breathing, and other respiratory symptoms. Coughing may be an isolated symptom; increases at night or with exercise are suspicious for asthma.

American Academy of Pediatrics

 
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