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Allergies Home Page arrow Most Recent Updates arrow Early Cat Exposure May Increase Children's Risk of Eczema
Early Cat Exposure May Increase Children's Risk of Eczema PDF Print E-mail
Children who are exposed to cats soon after birth may have an increased risk of developing eczema, according to a study presented at the American Thoracic Society International Conference.

Being exposed to two or more dogs at home suggested a slightly protective, but not significant, effect on children's risk of developing eczema, said lead researcher Esmeralda Morales, M.D., Pediatric Pulmonary Fellow at the University of Arizona in Tucson.

The study included 486 children who had been followed since birth. The researchers asked their parents how many cats and dogs they had in the house at the time the child was born, and then followed up one year later to see which children had been diagnosed with eczema.

Of the 134 children with cats in the household, 27.6 percent had eczema by one year of age, compared with 17.8 percent of 286 children without cats. While exposure to cats increased a child's risk of eczema whether or not their mother had asthma, the effect was more pronounced in children whose mothers did not have asthma.

Contradictory Data

Previous studies have found that people with eczema have a higher chance of also having allergic conditions including hay fever and asthma.

"Other studies have found that having cats or dogs at home seems to be protective against allergic diseases, so we expected to have similar findings," said Dr. Morales. "Pets are a source of a compound called endotoxin, and if a child is exposed to endotoxin early in life, the immune system may be skewed away from developing an allergic profile."

It's possible that the children in the study who developed eczema at age 1 might end up having a reduced risk of asthma or other allergic diseases later in life, Dr. Morales noted. "The findings do seem to add more questions about pets and asthma and allergies," she said. "Since there are a lot of contradictory data out there already, clearly it's a topic that needs further research."

American Thoracic Society

 
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